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Type 1 Diabetes Patient Free of Insulin Shots After 24 Years

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Islet cell transplant help a 33 year old kindergarten teacher live her live free of needles

How good will it be to wake up in the morning and not have to prick yourself to test your blood sugar? A recently opened trial have help some patients cure there type 1 diabetes.

It is a dream come true for Gina Marchini, who has undergone the Islet cell transplant and was saying she tested herself every two hours for days on end and the results came back in the non-diabetic range.

In another case study that came from City of Hope National Medical Center on islet cell transplant, 60 percent of patients, five years on, was producing sufficient insulin on there own. Islet transplantation is the transplantation of isolated islets from a donor pancreas into another person.

How good will it be if one day we can say “We had Diabetes”?

The results of the recently opened trial have yet to be written or even completed. But, as one of the approximately 1.25 million Americans diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, Marchini highlights the improvements and goals in diabetes research – as well as the still almost inconceivable promise of a life free of needles and restrictions.

A pioneer in islet cell transplantation, City of Hope is using its current clinical trial to refine its transplantation protocol, which depletes disease-causing immune cells while sparing helpful immune cells.

“The immune-suppression strategy used in this trial is considered a significant improvement over the protocol used in previous islet cell transplant trials, because under this new protocol, which includes an ATG (antithymoglobbulin) induction, the immune system will not harm the transplant,” said Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Department of Clinical Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism at City of Hope, who is leading the islet cell transplantation trial.

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